A care-penalty is the price one pays for doing care work for a family member. Care giving demands a lot out of an individual, and as a result there is a high opportunity cost. The opportunity cost can relate to both time and money. Instead of taking care of a family member, a caregiver could spend time working or performing more leisure activities. Care penalties are not strictly related to childcare- they can also refer to taking care of a sick family member, babysitting a younger sibling, or taking an elderly family member on errands such as grocery shopping or doctor's appointments.
“Lucas has been enrolled at the Aurora, CO TLE since they opened their doors. He has learned so much and has loved all of his teachers. He has progressed from Preppers to Preschool 1 and now Preschool 2. I am confident he will be prepared for Kindergarten next year. Alyssa started in the infant room and has just moved to Twaddlers. Both kids love the center and the management and teachers have been wonderful. ”
The children caregivers in many communities are deemed responsible to care for those younger than them and it is expected that they will do so. Adults are viewed as occasional supervisors of the caregiving while the caregivers are responsible for responding to the needs of each child. These young caregivers take pride in their responsibility and learn each child’s individual likes, dislikes, and habits.[22]
The day care industry is a continuum from personal parental care to large, regulated institutions. Some childminders care for children from several families at the same time, either in their own home (commonly known as "family day care" in Australia) or in a specialized child care facility. Some employers provide nursery provisions for their employees at or near the place of employment. For-profit day care corporations often exist where the market is sufficiently large or there are government subsidies. Research shows that not-for-profits are much more likely to produce the high quality environments in which children thrive."[18] Local governments, often municipalities, may operate non-profit day care centers. For all providers, the largest expense is labor. Local legislation may regulate the operation of daycare centers, affecting staffing requirements. In Canada, the workforce is predominantly female (95%) and low paid, averaging only 60% of average workforce wage. Some jurisdictions require licensing or certification. Legislation may specify details of the physical facilities (washroom, eating, sleeping, lighting levels, etc.).
We offer healthy, mostly organic and all homemade food. There is a large yard to run and play, sun, shade and plenty of trees.We offer a variety of learning experiences for children, including open-ended art, reading activities, music, dance, karate, physical education, yoga, cooking, drama, science and nature, indoor and outdoor games, and many more activities to enrich our learning program to make it fun and meaningful.
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